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in Life AWARENESS Rss

Goal Setting Matters

Posted on : 26-02-2013 | By : Cathy | In : Goals, Intention

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Athletes set goals to win competitions. Students set goals to graduate. Business owners set goals to increase revenue.

From everyday “to-do” lists to New Year’s Resolutions, goal setting is part of the human experience. People have always needed something to strive for—something upon which to focus energy and effort.

So, if goal setting is so ingrained in our nature, why are most people so bad at it? Perhaps it’s the way we approach it. Try the following ideas to gain a fresh perspective on setting your goals.

How to Get Better at Setting (and Reaching) Goals 

Size matters. Too many big goals can overwhelm. Incorporating the “half marathon approach” (starting small) helps “build the muscles” necessary for bigger challenges. Try limiting big-ticket goals to one or two.

Make it personal. Asking yourself “Why do I want this?” “How will I feel?” “What will it mean to me?” personalizes goals, making them easier to achieve.

Sharpen your pencil. When written down, priorities get clear. If the goals aren’t worth the time or effort to record, maybe they’re not worth the time and effort of achieving.

Create an environment. A physical environment can remind you how daily tasks add up to achieving longer-term goals. Use posters or a computer calendar to create visual reminders.

Stay on course. Even Columbus referred to his maps more than once per journey. Periodic checking of progress allows for re-charting the course or timeline.

Put it on the line. Sharing goals in public (family, friends, co-workers) means public accountability. Pride can be a great motivator.

Get help. Success is always easier to find with support. Talking to people about business and personal goals gets them on board with morale and tangible support.

Thursday’s post will discuss Intentions as another approach to setting goals. Stay tuned!

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