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in Life AWARENESS Rss

Cultivating Serenity in the Workplace and Beyond

Posted on : 03-07-2012 | By : Cathy | In : Uncategorized

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The serenity prayer of Alcoholics Anonymous says that the key to serenity is accepting what you cannot change, changing what you can, and possessing the wisdom to know the difference. The prayer is a good model that covers a lot of ground, but how do you tell the difference between what you can and cannot change? Here are some things you do have control over.

Your actions. No one can “make” you do anything. If you’re unhappy with your behavior at work or at home, change it, make amends if necessary, chart a new course.

Your words. Spoken or written, the words you choose impact your life and the lives of others. Choose your words carefully with workmates, colleagues, bosses, and clients, and quickly acknowledge any harm.

Your beliefs. If you believe that others should take care of your needs, then you will be frustrated when they don’t. If you believe things must be a certain way, you’ll surely face disappointment.

Your values. What’s important to you is your choice. No one else should tell you what to value. Spend some time clarifying your values and then aligning your work and life with them.

Your work. No one else can contribute to the world in the same way as you. Do whatever it takes to find your work.

Your friends. Those you associate with say a lot about what you think about yourself. You can choose friends who support you or those who bring you down.

Your input. You can select your sources of news and entertainment. If you feel adversely affected, turn off the computer, the TV, and/or ignore advertising. Fill downtime from work with other activities, such as leisurely walks, gardening (weeding can be especially helpful in managing anxiety), and cooking or other creative pursuits.

Your time. Though it may not always feel this way, you do choose every day how to use its 24 hours. Fill those hours with more of what you truly want, and watch your contentment rise.

Your basic health. While you can’t control your genetic make-up, you can choose to exercise, sleep enough, eat healthy food, and get routine check-ups. While you’re at it, don’t forget your mental health. Treat yourself a little better; trust a little more that things will work out for you; if you need professional help don’t let pride stop you from asking.

Your legacy. All that you choose while alive—your actions and words—will become the gift you leave when you die. What will be your legacy?

Common Roadblocks

Posted on : 24-04-2012 | By : Cathy | In : Uncategorized

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So how do you effect real change, change that starts from within? The first step is to identify just what is holding you back. Some common internal roadblocks are:

•  Fear. Probably the most popular culprit, the list of fears is endless. Whatever your fears, they prevent you in some way from experiencing your full potential.

•  Thinking small. If you expect less, you get less. You have to think big and believe you can have success before you will actually experience it.

•  Being out of balance. When we overfocus on certain areas of our lives to the exclusion of others, we experience stress and incongruence. Creativity is then compromised.

•  Lack of motivation. Without passion for what you’re doing (or at least a big payoff), it’s difficult to get moving in any direction.

Once you determine your specific roadblocks, it’s time to face them head on, reprogramming your beliefs and defining (or redefining) your life priorities and purpose. Working with a coach helps many to determine a practical strategy for navigating the roadblocks. Steven Covey of Seven Habits suggests writing a personal mission statement (as you would for a company) and then organizing your life around it.

For the goals that seem impossible to accomplish, Barbara Sher, career counselor and best-selling author, suggests throwing an “idea party.” Get a group of people together and take turns throwing out your ideas and their obstacles—you’ll be surprised at some of the creative answers you’ll receive.

But whatever you do, keep looking inside. Take responsibility for what you create externally and work on winning the inner game. When you do, you’ll start winning in the outer world, too.

Want to transform those limiting beliefs?

What if there was a simple, yet powerful technique to free your mind of negative beliefs that sabotage your success and happiness?

There is, PSYCH-K!

Most work takes place between 1-4 sessions!

Call to set up your appointment today!

(773) 736-6556

Playing the Inner Game to Win

Posted on : 23-04-2012 | By : Cathy | In : Uncategorized

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Tom has worked at his company for more than four years and knows he does a great job. His boss even tells him so. He’s been wanting to ask for a raise for several months, but it just never seems like the right time to ask. At least, that’s what he keeps telling himself.

But could it really be that Tom is afraid of rejection? Or on some level—perhaps a subconscious one—he doesn’t feel he “deserves” to get paid well for the work he does?

“In every human endeavor there are two arenas of engagement: the outer and the inner,” says Tim Gallwey, author of The Inner Game of Work. “The outer game is played on an external arena to overcome external obstacles. The inner game takes place within the mind and is played to overcome the self-imposed obstacles.”

You can try harder to change by taking more action in the “outside,” physical world. But if you’re powered by limiting beliefs and negative feelings, chances are you’re just going to go faster in the wrong direction.

Want to transform those limiting beliefs?

What if there was a simple, yet powerful technique to free your mind of negative beliefs that sabotage your success and happiness?

There is, PSYCH-K!

Most work takes place between 1-4 sessions!

Call to set up your appointment today!

(773) 736-6556

“Tolerations” Take a Toll

Posted on : 07-03-2012 | By : Cathy | In : Uncategorized

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What do desktop clutter, inadequate tools for the job, a too-chatty co-worker and a troublesome relationship with the boss have in common?

They’re all tolerations, the little and big things we put up with—often without realizing it—that sap our energy and drain our life force. Every time we tolerate something, we deplete the energy we could be using to grow our business or make desired changes or to simply experience joy. It’s like living with a low-grade fever or pain that somehow dulls our experience and zaps our full vitality.

When am I going to get to all that paperwork? Zap!

Ughhh. I wish he would just be quiet. Zap!

My computer just froze again—the third time today. Zap!

At the root of our tolerations are a variety of limiting beliefs that immobilize us. For example: “I can’t take the time.” “That’s just the way it is.” “Don’t rock the boat—play it safe.” “Don’t complain or be too demanding.” “It’s not that important.” “I have no control.”

There are countless limiting beliefs, yet they all serve to dampen our life force and keep us playing small. And, boy, are they exhausting!

For more information on how to get rid of limiting beliefs once and for all, contact me at (773) 736-6556.

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